Monthly Archives: June 2016

Press Releasefor Dr. Sheff’s Fall Speaking Tour

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

 

CONTACT: Dr. Elisabeth Sheff

 

EMAIL: drelisheff@gmail.com

 

Polyamory Expert, Dr. Elisabeth Sheff, Touring Fall 2016

Dr. Sheff will be available this fall and is currently booking engagements

 

Dr. Elisabeth Sheff will be touring the both coasts this fall, promoting her new book,When Someone You Love is Polyamorous, and speaking to Colleges, Universities, organizations, and not-for-profits.

 

Dr. Sheff speaks about Sex and Gender Diversity to organizations around the country. Informative, entertaining, and accessible, Dr. Elisabeth “Eli” Sheff is the foremost academic expert on polyamory in the US, and the worldwide expert on polyamorous families with children.

 

Dr. Sheff specializes in gender and sexual minority families, kink/BDSM, and issues facing trans* people. She is the CEO and Director of Legal Services at the Sheff Consulting Group, a think-tank of experts specializing in unconventional and underserved populations.

 

The tour takes place on the West Coast, October through November 2016. She will travel throughout Georgia, Virginia, Washington DC, Nevada, California, Oregon, and Washington.

 

Dr. Sheff is a smart, engaging, informative speaker. If you are interested in having Dr. Elisabeth Sheff speak to your organization, please contact her directly.

 

 

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Filed under book tour, diversity, Families, Gender, human rights, marriage, Media, non-monogamy, open relationships, Polyamory, Race and Ethnicity, relationships, Research, sex, sex education, sexuality, Uncategorized, When Someone You Love is Polyamorous, writing

Participate in Research on Polyfidelity?

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Polyfidelity Research Study
Jeff Peterson, LCPC, LPC, NCC is a mental health professional and an advocate for the polyamorous (polyfidelitous) community. He organized the LGBTQ-Affirmative Therapist Guild (Healthcare Guild), a non-profit organization that serves as an advocacy group for alternative relationships, sexual orientation, and gender identity.
This confidential study will help mental health professionals better understand and support those in a polyfidelity relationship. This is a confidential interview-based study, which means all you have to do is visit over the phone, videoconference, or in-person. If you or someone you know, of any sexual orientation or gender identity, living anywhere in the United States, has previously been or is currently involved in a committed relationship with three or more consenting adults, please refer them to this study. Your help can make a huge difference!
You can participate without leaving your home and withdraw at anytime!
Plus the time-commitment is very reasonable!
CONTACT: Jeff Peterson
Jeff Peterson is a doctoral student completing dissertation research in the Counselor Education and Supervision program at Walden University. This study has been approved by the Institutional Review Board (IRB) at Walden University.

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Filed under consensual nonmonogamy, diversity, Families, Gender, love, non-monogamy, Polyamory, relationships, Research, romance, sexuality, Uncategorized

Are polyamorous relationships sexist? New blog on Psychology Today

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Are polyamorous relationships sexist?
New Psychology Today blog answers that question

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Filed under bisexual, Blog, Gender, Polyamory, Psychology Today, relationships, Uncategorized

Participate in Research About Trans/Gender-Nonconforming College Students?

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A colleague I know and admire, Abbie Goldberg from the Department of Psychology at Clark University in Massachusetts, is conducting research with trans/gender-nonconforming college students. Check out the details below:

 

Trans/Gender-Nonconforming College Students Project

Abbie Goldberg, a Professor of Psychology at Clark University in Worcester MA, is conducting a survey of trans/gender-nonconforming college students (including recent graduates) regarding their perspectives and experiences on a range of topics, including trans advocacy and needed supports/services on college campuses. Students with non-binary gender identities are particularly encouraged to participate, as their experiences are rarely represented in research. Students may participate if they identify as trans, gender-nonconforming, gender questioning, genderqueer, agender, or anywhere on the gender-nonconforming spectrum. The survey, which was informed by focus groups and consultation with trans/gender nonconforming college students, takes about 25-30 minutes to complete. All responses are anonymous.Individuals can elect to be entered in a lottery for one of 10 $50.00 Amazon gift cards; individuals’ names and email addresses will not be connected to or traceable to the data that they provide.

 

Please contact the principal investigator of the study, Abbie Goldberg, with any questions or feedback, or to request to be informed of study findings: agoldberg@clarku.edu. Feel free to learn more about her researchon sexuality, gender, and families. Or visit the project Facebook page: www.facebook.com/transgnc.

 

This study has been approved by the Clark Committee for the Rights of Human Participants in Research and Training Programs (IRB).  Any questions about human rights issues should be directed to the IRB Chair, Dr. James P. Elliott: (508) 793-7152 or by e-mail (humansubjects@clarku.edu).

 

To participate, please follow the link:

 

https://clarku.co1.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_1ZbVuLudzxQyWdn

 

 

Abbie E. Goldberg, Ph.D.

Associate Professor & Director of Clinical Training

Department of Psychology

Clark University

Worcester MA 01610

Fax: (509) 7973-7265

agoldberg@clarku.edu

www.clarku.edu/faculty/goldberg

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Filed under diversity, Research, social equality, Transgender, Uncategorized

Otherfathering blog on Psychology Today

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In my most recent blog on Psychology Today I explore the concept of otherfathering and explain how polyaffectivity helps bio dads and social fathers (men with no legal or biological connection to the kids but love those kids even so) stay connected with children, even when the men are no longer having sex with the kids’ mother.

 

https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/the-polyamorists-next-door/201606/otherfathering-and-men-in-polyamorous-families

 

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Filed under Blog, consensual nonmonogamy, Families, Gender, non-monogamy, open relationships, Polyamory, Psychology Today, relationships, Uncategorized

Beautiful Example of Polyaffective Bisexual Diversity

 

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In a recent Cosmopolitan story, Zachary Zane explains why he decided to take his boyfriend’s wife on a date. Zane’s charming tale provides a perfect example of how he and his boyfriend’s wife develop a polyaffective relationship that makes all of their relationships stronger. It also provides a look at a real poly relationship beyond the tired trope of one man with two (or more) women and a one penis policy. Instead, this budding triad/vee has a male hot bi babe.

 

Like many polyaffective relationships, their emotional connection includes snuggling and some sleeping together in a big bed. It appears that both men identify as bisexual and there remains some possibility of sexual interaction for the triad in the future, but for now Zane reports that they are “rock solid” in their polyaffective relationship:

 

 Since our little rendezvous a month ago, our relationship has been rock solid. And when I say our, I mean all three of us. My relationship with her, my relationship with him, and I’ll go as far to say their relationship without me. She and I have an understanding of one another and don’t feel in direct competition. Instead of approaching our relationship with the mindset of: How can I make sure my needs are met when they’re up against hers, my mindset is now: How can we work together to make sure all of our needs are met? 

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Filed under bisexual, consensual nonmonogamy, dating, diversity, Families, Gender, love, marriage, non-monogamy, open relationships, Polyamory, relationships, sex, sexuality, Uncategorized

How To Talk About Sexting With Your Teen: Guest Post by Hilary Smith

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Many parents dread giving the “birds and the bees” talk to our kids. In days past, this talk involved a lot of awkward silences and euphemisms. Today, however, these talks can also be used to empower our sons and daughters to safely navigate their sexual development. Unfortunately, one area of concern parents often overlook is the role technology and sexting plays in our child’s sexual exploration.

 

For parents it can be daunting to begin talking about sexting, but we can’t overlook this new right of passage that comes with raising digital natives. Data shows that 40 percent of all high school age children send or receive sexts. To drive this point home, 70 percent of teenagers acknowledge they participate in sexting behaviors with their significant other. Admitting that our children are actively sexting can be difficult, but recent studies have found that sexting is a completely normal part of development.

 

Curious on How To Approach Sexting?

 

First, we need to take a deep breath and relax. After all, sexting isn’t alien or abnormal. These behaviors are often compared to an updated version of “I’ll show you mine, if you show me yours.” Many of our teens viewing sexting as a safe alternative for intercourse, because there are no pregnancy and STD threats when images are the only items being exchanged.

 

Given the secretive nature of sexual interactions, it can be very difficult for a parent to know if their child is sexting behind closed doors. The private nature of online interaction and especially sexting makes it even more important we address this issue before our kids encounter pressure from peers to participate. Hopefully, by encouraging open communication, we can give our sons and daughters the means and methods to protect themselves in a digital world.

 

Tips For “The Talk”

 

Thankfully, there are measures everyone can take to help reduce the risks associated with sexting. Listed below are eight pointers to help us approach the topic of sexting with our children:

 

  • Avoid name calling, yelling, or blaming during our discussion. As parents, we ultimately want to create a safe environment that our children feel comfortable discussing intimate topics.

 

  • Remind them that anything posted on the Internet will last forever. That includes deleted texts, messages, and disappearing apps. Stress that it is a good idea to only post images or messages that they would allow their grandparents to view.

 

  • Make sure they understand that once a sext is sent, the recipient holds their fate in their hands. Sexting leaves a person exposed to the whim of the person on the other end of the connection. Even disappearing messages can be retrieved or screenshots taken.

 

  • Stress the importance of consent. Consent is an important life skill, even if they are only snapping a racy selfie. Encourage them to question if they willingly want to participate or if they have the other person’s consent to share a personal photo.

 

  • Let teens know it’s alright to say NO. Experts estimate that 60 percent of teens who sext feel pressure to send racy images. A person who truly cares, will not force someone to do things they are uncomfortable with.

 

  • Teens need to understand the legal consequences they face if caught. Due to outdated laws, sexting between underage minors can be considered possessing or distributing child pornography, even if both parties consent. This can result in being labeled as a child predator, felon, and sexual offender.

 

  • Encourage interaction between people children know in real life and make sure they know how to adjust their privacy settings. After all, anything posted on social media is never really private.

 

  • Help protect their reputation by stressing the importance of keeping their faces and identifying traits out of a sext. Every now and then a sext is leaked or shared with others, which can cascade into cyberbullying and harassment cases. Simply adjust the angles of the photo to take an extra safeguard- just in case.

 

Caught In The Act: What Not To Say To A Sexting Teen

 

If you suspect your child is sexting, avoid reacting with rage and fury. It is believed that 70 percent of our teens take measures to hide their online activity from us. As parents, this can be difficult to digest. Watching our children dim screens or close windows the minute we walk in the room can easily set off our parental radars for questionable activity. Collect yourself and touch base with your teen using the above tips to help guide the conversation.

 

What methods does your family utilize to address teen sexting?

 

 

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Filed under Families, Guest Post, love, Media, relationships, romance, sex, sex education, sexuality, Uncategorized